Last edited by Kazrarn
Sunday, October 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of catalog of Luristan bronzes and early Islamic pottery found in the catalog.

catalog of Luristan bronzes and early Islamic pottery

Jerome M. Eisenberg

catalog of Luristan bronzes and early Islamic pottery

by Jerome M. Eisenberg

  • 71 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Royal-Athena Galleries in New York, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bronzes, Iranian -- Iran -- Luristān -- Catalogs,
  • Bronzes, Islamic -- Iran -- Luristān -- Catalogs,
  • Pottery, Islamic -- Catalogs

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Jerome M. Eisenberg.
    GenreCatalogs
    ContributionsRoyal-Athena Galleries
    The Physical Object
    Pagination52 p. :
    Number of Pages52
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21726665M

    Luristan Bronzes the name conventionally given in archaeology to bronze objects (daggers, axes, pins, clothing ornaments, horse harnesses) executed in the Irano-Caucasian animal style and obtained primarily by the plundering of ancient burial grounds in Luristan, in western Iran. Some scholars ascribe them to the second half of the second millennium B.C. Chinese influences on Islamic pottery cover a period starting from at least the 8th century CE to the 19th century. This influence of Chinese ceramics has to be viewed in the broader context of the considerable importance of Chinese culture on Islamic arts in general.

    A Luristan spike butted axe head, with cylindrical shaft hole decorated with furrowed ribs leading to four spiked ribs. The blade initially displays a short straight shaft, which widens into a crescent shaped head. The blade is decorated in abstract cross-hatching and lines on both sides and the top. This design is very rare amongst blades of this period. The upper and lower edges are thickened. Islamic pottery: 9thth century The first sight of T'ang pottery and porcelain, reaching Mesopotamia in the 9th century AD, seems to have brought home an obvious truth, always known in the far east but largely forgotten in the west since the days of classical Greece - that pottery can provide objects of great beauty as well as practical items.

    Product Description. This is a heavy war shaft axe from the Ancient Near Eastern Bronze Age. Where many ancient weapons were intended for ceremonial or votive purposes not made for or used in actual warfare, some were functional like this specimen. A striking weapon of this proportion and weight was most certainly used and intended for actual combat in ancient times. The Islamic conquest of Persia in the middle of the 7th century A.D. and the collapse of the Sassanid Empire marked the end of once geographically expansive and culturally diverse ancient superpower. The term LURISTAN references artifacts made by a society of semi-nomadic people that once lived in the mountainous region of Northwest Iran.


Share this book
You might also like
white side of a black subject

white side of a black subject

The blue comet

The blue comet

adventures of five hours

adventures of five hours

Radio astronomy.

Radio astronomy.

Awake my heart.

Awake my heart.

Clockmaking past and present.

Clockmaking past and present.

Jesse H. Strickland.

Jesse H. Strickland.

people so favored of God

people so favored of God

Higher grade schools and secondary instruction.

Higher grade schools and secondary instruction.

Privatization in the CIS

Privatization in the CIS

Catalog of Luristan bronzes and early Islamic pottery by Jerome M. Eisenberg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Eisenberg, Jerome M. Catalog of Luristan bronzes and early Islamic pottery. New York, N.Y.: Royal-Athena Galleries, © Early Islamic Pottery on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Early Islamic PotteryManufacturer: D.

Van Nostrand. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for SOTHEBY’S Persian Islamic Pottery Bronzes Olsen Collection Catalog at the best online Seller Rating: % positive. BRONZES OF LURISTAN, the accepted term for a distinct body of metalwork produced in the first half of the first millennium B.C.

and characterized by a wide range of idiosyncratic forms and a highly stylized conception of human and animal bronzes are to be distinguished from material excavated in Luristan but belonging to earlier periods and from material incorrectly.

Luristan bronzes (rarely "Lorestān", "Lorestāni" etc. in sources in English) are small cast objects decorated with bronze sculptures from the Early Iron Age which have been found in large numbers in Lorestān Province and Kermanshah in western Iran.

They include a great number of ornaments, tools, weapons, horse-fittings and a smaller number of vessels including situlae, and those found in. Early Islamic Pottery: Materials and Techniques [Anne-Marie Keblow Bernsted] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Early Islamic Pottery: Materials and TechniquesCited by: 6. An Archaeo-Metallurgical Study of the Early and Middle Bronze Age in Luristan, Iran Article (PDF Available) in Iranica Antiqua 43 January with Reads How we measure 'reads'. A Catalog of Luristan bronzes and early Islamic pottery Author: Eisenberg, Jerome M.

Published: () Iranian immigrants in the United States: a case study of dual marginality Author: Ansari, Abdolmaboud. Published: (). Medieval Islamic pottery occupied a geographical position between Chinese ceramics, then the unchallenged leaders of Eurasian production, and the pottery of the Byzantine Empire and Europe.

For most of the period it can fairly be said to have been between the two in terms of aesthetic achievement and influence as well, borrowing from China and exporting to and influencing Byzantium and Europe. West Asian potters invented this way of glazing pottery during the Roman Empire, but Roman potters didn’t use it very much.

Glass glazes became much more popular during the early Abbasid empire, about ’s because the glass glaze gave potters a way to copy white Chinese porcelain. Traders were bringing Chinese porcelain west to sell in Baghdad. With curly mane and loop on back of neck. In excellent condition, 1" x 1 1/4" x 1/4", on custom lucite stand height is 1 1/2".

Luristan bronzes are small cast objects decorated with bronze sculptures from the Early Iron Age which have been found in large numbers.

Hero and Animal Combat Beaker, silver, with Pair of Button-Based Situlae, bronze, all items BC, Luristan, Iran - Cleveland Museum of Art - DSCJPG 3, × 4,; MB. Lorestan Province (also written Luristan, Lurestan, or Loristan, Persian: استان لرستان ‎, Northern Luri: آستۊن لٛۏرسوݩ ‎, Kurdish: پارێزگای لوڕستان ‎) is a province of western Iran in the Zagros population of Lorestan was estimated at 1, people in In it was placed in Region 4.

Capital: Khorramabad. Luristan bronzes (rarely "Lorestān", "Lorestāni" etc. in sources in English) are small cast objects decorated with bronze sculptures from the Early Iron Age which have been found in large numbers in Lorestān Province and Kermanshah in west-central Iran.

They include a great number of ornaments, tools, weapons, horse-fittings and a smaller number of vessels including situlae, and those found. Although little, if any, known early Islamic pottery seems to have been made in imitation of Chinese green ware, it has been assumed that Islamic white-glazed pottery was patterned after white porcelain and that splashed or mottled vessels were based on Chinese san- ­ ts’ai (sancai, lit.

“three-color”) earthenware. Tang (­ C.E. "Islamic Pottery: A Brief History": The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 40, no. 4 (Spring, ) Jenkins, Marilyn () This title is out of print. Luristan, ancient Persia, c.

– BC. A choice Luristan bronze applique of a horned goat, standing on a integral square base with two holes on either side to fasten the piece to a pin, finial or similar. The animal is beautifully styled and well-preserved with a pleasant brown patina. H: 1 1/2" (cm). Luristan (or Lorestan) is a province of western Iran in the Zagros Mountains.

This area was populated by migrant tribes in the 3rd and 4th millennium BC. An ancient people known as the Kassites, who had no Semitic or Indo-European language, originated in Luristan.

In the 2nd millennium BC, the region was invaded and settled by the Iranian Medes. - Showcasing various artifacts from ancient Iran.

See more ideas about Ancient, Artifacts, Middle east culture.9 pins. The label "Luristan bronzes" designates a series of decorated bronze objects in a specific local style dating from the Iron Age (ca. / to / BCE). Grube, Ernst J., Islamic Pottery of the Eighth to the Fifteenth Century in the Keir Collection, London, ISBN.

X ISBN. X Hasson, Rachel, Early Islamic Glass (L. A. Mayer Memorial Institute for Islamic Art), Jerusalem, Jul 5, - Explore farnazaliabadi9's board "Luristan Bronze" on Pinterest.

See more ideas about Bronze, Ancient art, Ancient pins.Luristan Bronze Ibex C. B.C. MEASUREMENTS 3 1/16 and 3 1/2in. ( and cm) DESCRIPTION comprising a highly stylized figure of a man standing with his splayed hands extended forward and wearing a conical headdress, his face with grooved mouth and protruding round eyes, and a Luristan whetstone handle in the form of the forequarters of a couchant ibex with tall horns swept back .